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Tièbèlè, the painting village, of the people Gourounsi by Anthony Pappone

In the south of Burkina Faso,there is a village near the border with Ghana, is a small size, called Tiébélé. This is the home of the Kassena people, one of the oldest ethnic groups who settled in the territory of Burkina Faso.
i photographed the life the people and architecture of the houses  richly decorated mud walls. 
The Kassena people build their houses entirely of local materials: earth, wood and straw. Soil mixed with straw and cow dung is moistened to a state of perfect plasticity, to shape almost vertical surfaces. 
Tiébélé’s houses are built with defense in mind, whether that be against the climate or potential enemies.
the homes are designed without windows except for a small opening or two to let just enough light in to see, Roofs are protected with wood ladders that are easily retracted. 
the walls of the houses are decorated and hand painted by the women of the village done just before the rainy season and protects the outside walls from the rain.  varnishing with néré all make the designs withstand wet weather, enabling the structures to last longer.

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The last head hunters, Konyak tribe warrior by Anthony Pappone

The Konyak tribes have traditionally had a strong warrior tradition and are mostly famous because they were still headhunting until the end of 1960.
As a trade mark honorarium a young warrior konyak would receive a tattoo of his face, when he bore to the king the head of an enemy while the tattoo on the chest is yet another typical traditional tattoo, which was a high social privilege and only the best and most brave warriors had wear tattooed.
in addition to having facial tattoos and tattoos on the body their symbols of warriors konyak are big pierced ears made ​​of animal horns, war hats were made of hunted wild pigs horns, hornbill feathers and wild bear or goat hair. 
Konyaks used a traditional basket specifically made to carry and bring back human heads from war. It was decorated with monkey skulls, wild pigs horns and sometimes hornbill beaks.
also wear a necklace with of bronze faces that means the number of heads who have cut.
It was believed that by taking head of an enemy as a trophy, he took his power and soul.
This was a common practice until the Christianization put an end to their culture and their tradition.
The Konyak tribes resisted the Christianization and modernization longer than most of the other tribes.

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Bayon Temple 
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Holy Men of Varanasi, India by Joey L.

Varanasi is one of the oldest inhabited cities in the world; it’s thought that people may have lived in Varanasi for about 3,000 years or longer. It’s the epicenter of Hindu faith, similar to Jerusalem for Christians and Mecca for Muslims.


Sadhus live in different corners of the world, the connection all these subjects have to each other is profound. Almost every major religion breeds ascetics; wandering monks who have renounced all earthly possessions, dedicating their lives to the pursuit of spiritual liberation. Their reality is dictated only by the mind, not material objects. Even death is not a fearsome concept, but a passing from the world of illusion.

1. Vijay Nund performing morning rituals in the Ganges River, the most sacred river in Hinduism.

2. Ascetic priest Baba Vijay Nund rows a boat along the Ganges River.

3. Aghori sadhus inside a sunken Shiva temple at Scindia Ghat, on the banks of the River Ganges.

4. Aghori sadhus cover themselves with human ash, which is the last rite of the material body.

5. The Aghori have a profound connection with the dead. Death is not a fearsome concept, but a passing from the world of illusion.

6. Amit Byasi & Banmi Shri Ra, Batuk Students.

7. Ram Das beside boat wreckage.

8. Lal Baba’s life is to travel. Even at 85 years old, he will continue to travel from holy place to holy place in India and Nepal. When he was young, Lal Baba’s parents arranged a marriage for him. Uncertain about his future, he ran away from home in Bihar Siwan and took up the lifelong task of becoming a sadhu.

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Expedition on the remote sumatran island of Siberut, meeting Mentawai tribes, Project by Etienne Desclides 

Despite the campaigns of evangelization and settlement during the past century, some groups were able to maintain their traditional way of life, far from the modern world, building their umas, the community long-houses, deep in the rainforest, eating sago tree and hunting monkeys with poisoned arrows.

The clan of Bajak Sorumut is one of them.

The old man is the rimata, the patriarch, the soul of the clan. He is the spiritual leader, the keeper of the tradition. He ensures the subsistence of his family and preserves the harmony in the uma.

He is also a kerei, a mentawai shaman, a healer. He is able to communicate with spirits. He can heal wounds, soothe the sick. He knows the ancient gestures to make the omai, the dangerous poison the natives use for their survival in the rainforest for millennia.

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It’s the truth, even if it didn’t happen.Ken KeseyOne Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest (1962) 
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