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Tièbèlè, the painting village, of the people Gourounsi by Anthony Pappone

In the south of Burkina Faso,there is a village near the border with Ghana, is a small size, called Tiébélé. This is the home of the Kassena people, one of the oldest ethnic groups who settled in the territory of Burkina Faso.
i photographed the life the people and architecture of the houses  richly decorated mud walls. 
The Kassena people build their houses entirely of local materials: earth, wood and straw. Soil mixed with straw and cow dung is moistened to a state of perfect plasticity, to shape almost vertical surfaces. 
Tiébélé’s houses are built with defense in mind, whether that be against the climate or potential enemies.
the homes are designed without windows except for a small opening or two to let just enough light in to see, Roofs are protected with wood ladders that are easily retracted. 
the walls of the houses are decorated and hand painted by the women of the village done just before the rainy season and protects the outside walls from the rain.  varnishing with néré all make the designs withstand wet weather, enabling the structures to last longer.

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The last head hunters, Konyak tribe warrior by Anthony Pappone

The Konyak tribes have traditionally had a strong warrior tradition and are mostly famous because they were still headhunting until the end of 1960.
As a trade mark honorarium a young warrior konyak would receive a tattoo of his face, when he bore to the king the head of an enemy while the tattoo on the chest is yet another typical traditional tattoo, which was a high social privilege and only the best and most brave warriors had wear tattooed.
in addition to having facial tattoos and tattoos on the body their symbols of warriors konyak are big pierced ears made ​​of animal horns, war hats were made of hunted wild pigs horns, hornbill feathers and wild bear or goat hair. 
Konyaks used a traditional basket specifically made to carry and bring back human heads from war. It was decorated with monkey skulls, wild pigs horns and sometimes hornbill beaks.
also wear a necklace with of bronze faces that means the number of heads who have cut.
It was believed that by taking head of an enemy as a trophy, he took his power and soul.
This was a common practice until the Christianization put an end to their culture and their tradition.
The Konyak tribes resisted the Christianization and modernization longer than most of the other tribes.

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Bayon Temple 
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Holy Men of Varanasi, India by Joey L.

Varanasi is one of the oldest inhabited cities in the world; it’s thought that people may have lived in Varanasi for about 3,000 years or longer. It’s the epicenter of Hindu faith, similar to Jerusalem for Christians and Mecca for Muslims.


Sadhus live in different corners of the world, the connection all these subjects have to each other is profound. Almost every major religion breeds ascetics; wandering monks who have renounced all earthly possessions, dedicating their lives to the pursuit of spiritual liberation. Their reality is dictated only by the mind, not material objects. Even death is not a fearsome concept, but a passing from the world of illusion.

1. Vijay Nund performing morning rituals in the Ganges River, the most sacred river in Hinduism.

2. Ascetic priest Baba Vijay Nund rows a boat along the Ganges River.

3. Aghori sadhus inside a sunken Shiva temple at Scindia Ghat, on the banks of the River Ganges.

4. Aghori sadhus cover themselves with human ash, which is the last rite of the material body.

5. The Aghori have a profound connection with the dead. Death is not a fearsome concept, but a passing from the world of illusion.

6. Amit Byasi & Banmi Shri Ra, Batuk Students.

7. Ram Das beside boat wreckage.

8. Lal Baba’s life is to travel. Even at 85 years old, he will continue to travel from holy place to holy place in India and Nepal. When he was young, Lal Baba’s parents arranged a marriage for him. Uncertain about his future, he ran away from home in Bihar Siwan and took up the lifelong task of becoming a sadhu.

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Expedition on the remote sumatran island of Siberut, meeting Mentawai tribes, Project by Etienne Desclides 

Despite the campaigns of evangelization and settlement during the past century, some groups were able to maintain their traditional way of life, far from the modern world, building their umas, the community long-houses, deep in the rainforest, eating sago tree and hunting monkeys with poisoned arrows.

The clan of Bajak Sorumut is one of them.

The old man is the rimata, the patriarch, the soul of the clan. He is the spiritual leader, the keeper of the tradition. He ensures the subsistence of his family and preserves the harmony in the uma.

He is also a kerei, a mentawai shaman, a healer. He is able to communicate with spirits. He can heal wounds, soothe the sick. He knows the ancient gestures to make the omai, the dangerous poison the natives use for their survival in the rainforest for millennia.

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It’s the truth, even if it didn’t happen.Ken KeseyOne Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest (1962) 
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Rainbow Gathering, Experimenting Self Transformation

Benoit Paillé 

Rainbow Gatherings are communities meeting in a nature setting to share together the ideals of peace, harmony and respect and to create an alternative to popular culture, mass media and materialism. The first Rainbow took place in 1972, at the National Forest Land (United States) and has been held annually ever since. Other Rainbow regional communities come together throughout the year all over the world. For my part, I attended seven such Rainbow meetings in Quebec, two in Mexico, one in the Canary Islands and one in Guatemala.

What’s cool about the Rainbow is that it is hidden; it takes place in isolation in the woods, far away. You must drive and walk for a long time, there is something magical to looking for it. At first glance, it’s like a tribe that is organized like a mini-city. Spaces are set up for a kitchen, a children area, a coffee shop, a music camp, etc… And a central circle with a big fire in the middle. It’s the sacred fire.  This is where we eat; it is a place to share. Meals are completely vegan. Rainbows are provided for by local grocers who donate organic food, lentils, oats, etc… Other Rainbows organise “dumpster divings”: all the food comes from stuff wasted and thrown in the bins in cities. We get up with the sun. I sleep in a tent, but many sleep under a simple cover. We completely lose track of time, it is a rare and valuable thing to happen in life. There is also a lot of music in the evening, with jam sessions and dancing.
There you can experience a real micro-society. All views are gathered in a reduced space-time, within a smaller geography. We experience all these differences and confrontations, and experiment in matters of conflict management. We learn to talk, look, understand, to become more tolerant. All ideologies and beliefs coexist in harmony. In Quebec, if there is a conflict on a topic, we create a talking circle where we pass on the “Stick of speech”. When you hold the stick, nobody else can talk, even if the circle is 400 strong. We discuss very practical issues and decisions are not made through a majority vote, but truly through a common consensus. It can take days. At Rainbow, we often say “We are one.”
You return from a Rainbow with ideas, ideas for changing your life. Personally, I’ve never felt comfortable with the life I was living, and I questioned it. Vegan, nomad, green: we encounter people who have different lifestyles. We discover that it is possible to be happy living another way. I particularly realized the importance of taking care of my body, of eating better, of taking better care of the environment. Of being able to get rid of our addiction to technology and the Internet.
 When you come back, you appreciate comfort again, but you quickly want to go back and to see again the people you’ve met, the people you love. Communities are created. After the Rainbow, a talking circle is often formed to create a community. In Guatemala, the site of the Rainbow was acquired to found a great eco-community. Coming back from the Rainbow means be have reconsidered yourself, you have been transformed, even purged, of technology among other things. And it is clear that you return, you judge much more severely the society you live in.
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